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A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 31: ‘Thy bosom is endeared with all hearts’

A reading of Shakespeare’s 31st sonnet

After the two preceding sonnets, Sonnet 31 seems like a bit of a comedown and, indeed, a let-down; yet it’s worthy of analysis because of its treatment of the idea of a love ‘dead’ and ‘buried’.

Thy bosom is endeared with all hearts,
Which I by lacking have supposed dead;
And there reigns Love, and all Love’s loving parts,
And all those friends which I thought buried.
How many a holy and obsequious tear
Hath dear religious love stol’n from mine eye,
As interest of the dead, which now appear
But things removed that hidden in thee lie!
Thou art the grave where buried love doth live,
Hung with the trophies of my lovers gone,
Who all their parts of me to thee did give,
That due of many now is thine alone:
Their images I loved, I view in thee,
And thou (all they) hast all the all of me. Read the rest of this entry

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A Short Analysis of Emily Dickinson’s ‘One need not be a Chamber to be Haunted’

A summary of a classic poem

‘One need not be a Chamber – to be Haunted’. So begins one of Emily Dickinson’s most striking poems. This poem requires close analysis because it presents an interesting nineteenth-century example of the internalisation of ‘spirits’ and the notion of ‘haunting’.

One need not be a Chamber—to be Haunted—
One need not be a House—
The Brain has Corridors—surpassing
Material Place—

Far safer, of a Midnight Meeting
External Ghost
Than its interior Confronting—
That Cooler Host. Read the rest of this entry

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 30: ‘When to the sessions of sweet silent thought’

A reading of Shakespeare’s 30th sonnet

‘When to the sessions of sweet silent thought / I summon up remembrance of things past’: these rank among the more famous lines from Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Sonnet 30 very much continues the idea introduced in the previous sonnet, that when he’s feeling a bit down the poet can make himself feel much better simply by thinking of the Fair Youth. Here is a short summary and analysis of Sonnet 30 and its uplifting loveliness.

When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time’s waste:
Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow,
For precious friends hid in death’s dateless night,
And weep afresh love’s long since cancelled woe,
And moan the expense of many a vanished sight:
Then can I grieve at grievances foregone,
And heavily from woe to woe tell o’er
The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan,
Which I new pay as if not paid before. Read the rest of this entry