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A Short Analysis of Yeats’s ‘He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’

An introduction to the poem ‘He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’ by W. B. Yeats

‘He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’ is one of W. B. Yeats‘s (1865-1939) most popular poems. It’s also one of his shortest – just eight lines in all. Since we started to offer our own close analysis of short English poems that we believe repay closer attention, we’ve offered, among others, a short analysis of a Wilfred Owen poem, ‘Futility’. Now, it’s Yeats’s turn. So first, here’s the poem.

Had I the heavens’ embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.

Interestingly, when the poem was first published in Yeats’s third volume of poems, The Wind among the Reeds, in 1899, it appeared under the title ‘Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’, Aedh being the speaker of the poem – a pale, sensitive, Keatsian, Romantic figure of a poet. This suggests that we are supposed to view the poem itself as slightly W B Yeatstongue-in-cheek, a somewhat over-the-top declaration (which casts Aedh as a sort of Sir Walter Raleigh of poetry, figuratively spreading his cloak of dreams beneath the female addressee, as Sir Walter was supposed to have laid his cloak over a puddle for Queen Elizabeth I). Even with the later change in title to ‘He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’, there is something in that title – with the use of the present tense and third-person pronoun suggesting something of the stage direction – that renders it slightly ironic.

The message is straightforward, and a perennial one in poetry (and, indeed, song lyrics). The speaker, addressing his lover or would-be lover, says: if I were a rich man, I’d give you the world and all its treasures. If I were a god, I could take the heavenly sky and make a blanket out of it for you. (This is similar to the sentiment expressed by the speaker of T. E. Hulme’s ‘The Embankment’.) But I’m only a poor man, and obviously the idea of making the sky into a blanket is silly and out of the question, so all I have of any worth are my dreams. And dreams are delicate and vulnerable – hence ‘Tread softly’.

This is a rather old idea, but what helps to make the poem striking and memorable is its use of repetition of key words: cloths (three times), dreams (three times), light (three times), spread (twice), tread (twice), under your feet (twice). (And, if we include the title, you might add an extra ‘cloths’ and count ‘heaven’ as one of the repeated words.) The rhyme of the poem supports this repetition: technically, there are no rhymes as such, merely the same words repeated at the end of lines: cloths, light, feet, dreams. This gives the words of the poem a simplicity but also a sense of familiarity, even banality: the poet is reduced to finding slightly different ways of saying the same thing. But playing off this rhyme-that-is-not-rhyme at the end of the lines is the internal rhyme: ‘Of night and light and the half light‘, ‘I have spread my dreams under your feet; / Tread softly because you tread on my dreams’. Because this involves words which are themselves repeated, it shifts the expected rhyme (e.g. night and light at the end of the lines) to the middle of the lines, highlighting that things are not as the poet would wish them to be.

Perhaps its brevity and simplicity is one reason why this Yeats poem is so loved; but our aim in this short analysis of the poem has been to bring home some of the subtler things at work in it. If you like ‘He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’, you might also like ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree‘, our analysis of ‘The Second Coming’, our summary of ‘Sailing to Byzantium’, and our commentary on ‘Leda and the Swan’. We have more about Yeats’s beliefs here.

The best edition of Yeats’s essential poetry (and some of his prose and dramatic works) is The Major Works including poems, plays, and critical prose (Oxford World’s Classics). It also has a very helpful introduction and copious notes.

Or if you’re looking for your next poet to discover, check out our pick of Robert Burns’s best poems and the greatest Thomas Hardy poems. Our advice on how to write an English essay might also be of interest.

Image: W. B. Yeats in 1911, by George Charles Beresford; Wikimedia Commons.

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About interestingliterature

A blog dedicated to rooting out the interesting stuff about classic books and authors.

Posted on November 6, 2015, in Literature and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. Gorgeous, romantic, sweet and tender. Thanks for bringing awareness to me of this lovely poem.

  2. That’s a very good analysis of the poem. I often though about the hidden rhyme (so to speak) but you’ve brought it out so beautifully! :)

  3. Ah… a very good analysis of one of my favourite poems. I feel in love with it a lifetime ago when I was a teenager and wasn’t operating with any kind of filter or irony regarding my love – it seemed to sum up my own feelings perfectly:). As I’ve matured, I still love the apparent simplicity and elegant craft that makes it so popular. Thank you.

  4. Another of my favourite poems. I really like these posts of yours. Will share again on FB. :)

  5. Wonderful post. Helping with the new book, too.

  6. Thanks for this discussion of one of his greatest poems. I don’t view it as tongue in cheek, but as an expression of deep devotion. Aedh is one of the personae in that book who take turns speaking, different aspects of his personality. And I think Aedh is the “vulnerable Yeats” who loved Maud Gonne and was rejected.

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