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A Short Analysis of W, B. Yeats’s ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’

A summary of a classic Yeats poem

The poetry of Yeats often touches upon the idea of chucking it all away and heading off somewhere. In ‘Sailing to Byzantium’, one of his most popular poems, the ageing poet takes himself off to the Turkish city in search of spiritual fulfilment and retraining. But one of Yeats’s other best-known poems about moving on to another place is ‘The Lake Isle of Innsifree’, a poem which first appeared in Yeats’s 1893 collection The Rose, when Yeats was still a young man in his late twenties. What follows is the poem, along with some notes towards an analysis of its meaning the language.

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made;
Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee,
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,
Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;
There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,
And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

I will arise and go now, for always night and day
I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;
While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey,
I hear it in the deep heart’s core.

Innishfree (‘Isle of Heather’) is located near the southern shore of Lough Gill, in County Sligo, Ireland. Why does Yeats want to take off there? The sentiment is one we can probably all relate to: wanting to leave behind the world and the life we inhabit, and ‘get back to nature’ and to a simpler existence. It seems more spiritually fulfilling, more tranquil, more wholesome. This is what ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’ is about.

lake-isle-of-innisfreeIn summary, Yeats describes his intention to go to Innisfree and build a small cabin of clay and wattles, to grow beans and keep bees for honey, and to live on his own there. The world is quiet and peaceful at Innisfree, the sound of the linnet birds the only thing puncturing the tranquil silence of the evening. The poet feels as though the lake isle of Innisfree is calling to him: he imagines that he hears the waters of the lake lapping around the shore, as if he has some spiritual kinship with the place. Inhabiting the town or city has he does, a place marked by pavements and roads and all the bustle and loudness of urban life that they suggest, he nevertheless feels the earth calling to him.

One of the most intriguing features of ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’, and one that needs to be mentioned in this analysis, is the tautological language Yeats employs to convey his meaning. Even the title contains a tautology, since ‘Innis(h)free’ means ‘Isle of Heather’, and so ‘the lake isle of Innisfree’ means ‘the lake isle of the isle of heather’. To arise and go are not the same thing, but they converge: and to say ‘I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree’ is to announce that one is going to go twice. Does the poet – or his speaker, leastways – really intend to go? Or is the poem merely an articulation of his desire to do so, when he knows (like most of us who talk about ‘getting away from it all’) that he probably never will summon the courage to leave the city behind and head to the seclusion of the lake isle.

Similarly, the very last line of the poem, ‘I feel it in the deep heart’s core’, ends on another tautology, since ‘core’ stems from the Latin for ‘heart’. We may have to do a double-take: not ‘earth’s core’, as we might have expected, but that word’s anagram, ‘heart’. Does ‘heart’ refer, though, to the heart of the Earth – ‘core’ summoning up the Earth’s core – or does it refer to the poet’s heart? Is this voice calling him from within himself, or is nature calling to him?

There is, perhaps, no straightforward answer, nor should there be. ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’ is one of W. B. Yeats’s first great poems, and is worth reading and discussing for that reason alone. If you enjoyed the poem, you can discover more of Yeats’s work with our analysis of his classic 1919 poem ‘The Second Coming’.

Image: The Lake Isle of Innisfree near Killerry, Sligo, Ireland, by Kenneth Allen via geograph.ie.

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About interestingliterature

A blog dedicated to rooting out the interesting stuff about classic books and authors.

Posted on December 28, 2016, in Literature and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 8 Comments.

  1. One of my favorite poems. When I walk, I bring along my iPod filled with poetry. I especially like when I can hear poets read their words of poetry. They were able to capture W.B.Yeats reading “The Lake Isle of Innisfree.”

  2. I love this one – it sounds beautiful in the mouth and part of that is the repetition…

  3. I pair Innisfree with Second Coming to mark the effect of WWI on creative minds, moving on to Hollow Men. Students begin to see how the Great War forever changed art as a man goes from raising bees and beans to warding off the atrocities of war. Thanks for the added insights of going and the idea of going.

  1. Pingback: A Short Analysis of W, B. Yeats’s ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’ — Interesting Literature | Phil Slattery Art

  2. Pingback: A Short Analysis of W, B. Yeats’s ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’ | Writing hints and competitions

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