A Short Analysis of the ‘Once More unto the Breach, Dear Friends’ Speech from Henry V

By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University)

‘Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more’ is the second most famous speech from Shakespeare’s Henry V, after Henry’s celebrated Crispin’s Day speech. This speech comes in Act 3 Scene 1 of the play, during the siege of Harfleur in Normandy, carried out by the real historical King Henry V in 1415 as part of the Hundred Years War.

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‘Out, Damned Spot’: A Summary and Analysis of Lady Macbeth’s Sleepwalking Scene

By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University)

‘Out, damned spot’ is one of the most recognisable phrases uttered by Lady Macbeth in William Shakespeare’s great tragedy. The scene mirrors Macbeth’s earlier references to his own guilt, and acts as a clear indication of how the once-defiant and determined Lady Macbeth, one of Shakespeare’s most fully realised female villains, has become undone by her own conscience. And she reveals all of this while she’s asleep.

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A Short Analysis of Othello’s ‘It is the Cause, it is the Cause, My Soul’ Speech

By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University)

‘It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul’: so begins Act 5 Scene 2 of Shakespeare’s Othello, with Othello’s speech leading up to his killing of Desdemona. This is the final scene of the play; by the end of it, Othello and Desdemona will both be dead, the tragedy brought to its grisly conclusion.

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A Short Analysis of Constance’s ‘Grief Fills the Room up of My Absent Child’ Speech from King John

By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University)

‘Grief fills the room up of my absent child’: so begins perhaps the most celebrated and moving speech in all of King John, which is not exactly a Shakespeare play that’s replete with celebrated speeches. The play lurks somewhere in the attic of Shakespeare’s oeuvre, out of sight, gathering cobwebs, as if best forgotten.

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