A Summary and Analysis of Siegfried Sassoon’s ‘Dreamers’

By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University)

‘Dreamers’ is a poem by the British poet of the First World War, Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967). Written while Sassoon was convalescing at Craiglockhart Hospital, ‘Dreamers’ is a poem which contrasts the realities of war with the soldiers’ longing for home and domestic comfort and security.

You can read ‘Dreamers’ here before proceeding to our analysis of the poem below.

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A Short Analysis of Siegfried Sassoon’s ‘The General’

‘The General’ is one of the most famous poems written by Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967). After Wilfred Owen, Sassoon was probably the most celebrated – and perhaps the most gifted – English poet to write about his experiences in the First World War. But where Owen writes about ‘the pity of war’, Sassoon gives us another emotion: anger.

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A Short Analysis of Siegfried Sassoon’s ‘They’

Many of the war poems of Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) take aim at authority figures, older and more powerful men such as generals and majors who hold the fates of the younger generation in their hands. ‘They’, one of Sassoon’s most famous poems, focuses on religious authority, embodied in the poem by the Bishop. You can read Sassoon’s ‘They’ here before proceeding to our summary and analysis below.

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A Summary and Analysis of Siegfried Sassoon’s ‘Base Details’

By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University)

Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) wrote ‘Base Details’ in 1917; it appeared in his diary entry for 4 March. It’s one of his best short poems satirising the older generation who sent so many younger men to their deaths in the First World War. You can read Sassoon’s ‘Base Details’ here before reading on to our summary and analysis below.

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A Short Analysis of Siegfried Sassoon’s ‘Everyone Sang’

A reading of a classic war poem

‘Everyone Sang’ is one of Siegfried Sassoon’s most popular and widely anthologised poems. The poem was published in 1919, the year following the end of the First World War, and the jubilant singing that features in the poem has been interpreted as a reference to the Armistice. You can read ‘Everyone Sang’ here.

A few words of summary first, then. ‘Everyone Sang’ is divided into two stanzas, each of five lines. The stanzas rhyme abcbb. The speaker of the poem hears everyone around suddenly burst into song, and the sound of singing fills him with delight. There’s a suggestion that this delight is related to a feeling of relief and, indeed, release: he likens it to the feeling a bird that had been caged must feel when it is freed and allowed to fly away.

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