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A Short Analysis of Christina Rossetti’s ‘Good Friday’

A summary of a Rossetti poem

‘Good Friday’ was published in Christina Rossetti’s 1866 collection The Prince’s Progress and Other Poems. The poem is about Rossetti’s struggle to feel close to Christ and the teachings of Christianity, and to weep for the sacrifice he made. Below we offer a short summary and analysis of ‘Good Friday’, focusing on its language and meaning.

Am I a stone, and not a sheep,
That I can stand, O Christ, beneath Thy cross,
To number drop by drop Thy blood’s slow loss,
And yet not weep?

Not so those women loved
Who with exceeding grief lamented Thee;
Not so fallen Peter, weeping bitterly;
Not so the thief was moved;

Not so the Sun and Moon
Which hid their faces in a starless sky,
A horror of great darkness at broad noon –
I, only I.

Yet give not o’er,
But seek Thy sheep, true Shepherd of the flock;
Greater than Moses, turn and look once more
And smite a rock.

We’ll begin with a brief summary of ‘Good Friday’. Rossetti regrets the fact that when she stands and looks up at a depiction of Jesus Christ being crucified, the sight does not move her to tears, unlike the women revered in the Christian tradition who mourned Christ’s death, and Saint Peter, one of Christ’s Apostles, who wept ‘bitterly’ over Jesus’ sacrifice. Even one of the two thieves – between whom Jesus was executed – was moved by his sacrifice.

RossettiEven the sun and the moon seem to have been affected by the Crucifixion, since they both disappeared from view as if in mourning, and the sky turned dark, when Jesus died. (The sky went dark, even at midday.) No, Rossetti says, it is only she who is not moved by it – but she wishes she were. Rossetti thus concludes ‘Good Friday’ by entreating Jesus Christ to continue to try to reach her with the power of his sacrifice, likening him to a shepherd who needs to find her, one of his lost sheep. Rossetti ends by alluding to the story of Moses, the Old Testament figure who led the Jews out of Egypt and to Israel. According to the Book of Numbers, ‘Moses lifted up his hand, and with his rod he smote the rock twice: and the water came out abundantly, and the congregation drank, and their beasts also’ (20:11). Since Christ is greater than Moses, Rossetti argues, if he smites (i.e. strikes) a rock, it will be of such power that Rossetti will be converted and overcome by the power of Christianity.

What does Rossetti’s poem ‘Good Friday’ mean? Even though Rossetti knows Christianity inside out (she tells Christ she can ‘number drop by drop Thy blood’s slow loss’), knowing about something doesn’t automatically lead to feeling its power. She has gazed on the sight of Jesus on the Cross many times, but looking at it, and knowing its significance, doesn’t automatically inspire tears.

Rossetti begins ‘Good Friday’ with a suggestion that is hard, cold, and immovable: unlike a ‘sheep’ which will follow God as part of his flock, she is a ‘stone’ – the implication being that her heart is as hard and unmoved as stone. The ‘stone’ image with which Christina Rossetti begins ‘Good Friday’ reverberates throughout the poem, like a pebble skimming across the surface of a lake: it resurfaces first in ‘Peter’, one of Christ’s Apostles who was so named by Jesus (his original name was actually Simon) because he was going to be the ‘rock’ on which Jesus built his church (Peter is from the Greek petros, ‘rock’, from which we also get ‘petroleum’). Then it returns in that final line and the violent command, ‘smite a rock.’ Just as Moses striking the rock in the Old Testament gave water and therefore life to his people, so Christ smiting the rock will nourish and inspire Rossetti’s deeper belief in Christianity.

‘Good Friday’ puts us in mind of another Victorian poem, not by Christina Rossetti but by Tennyson, named In Memoriam, of which T. S. Eliot once observed: ‘Its faith is a poor thing, but its doubt is a very intense experience.’ We might analyse Rossetti’s ‘Good Friday’ in such terms: it’s a great Victorian religious poem not because of its out-and-out praise of God, but because it offers a more complex and nuanced take on religious faith.

Image: Portrait of Christina Rossetti by Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1866), public domain.

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About interestingliterature

A blog dedicated to rooting out the interesting stuff about classic books and authors.

Posted on November 15, 2016, in Literature and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Belinda Conniss @balou5

    Absolutely beautiful words, and a lovely write up after. Inspiring
    Thank you.
    Belinda.

  1. Pingback: A Short Analysis of Christina Rossetti’s ‘Good Friday’ — Interesting Literature – insideoutlastyle – Belinda Conniss Author/Writer

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